Tasting Notes

BLANK bottle – Good Wine, Real People, Great Stories

10 December 2018 by Richard

For a limited time only, we are offering 6 bottles for the price of 5 on this exclusive Good Wine Shop and BLANK bottle collaboration, click here to buy a case online. Offer ends 31st of December.

Pieter Walser is the brains behind the BLANK bottle concept. He reminds me of the most popular boy at school who effortlessly excels at everything he does. He shines as a cult winemaker, an artist, a marketer, a surfer, an actor, a negociant, a designer, an entrepreneur, a family man, a visionary, a raconteur, a party animal, a leader, a rebel, a genius, a magician… you get my drift. Whilst Pieter comfortably wears all these hats with great aplomb, he says he prefers not to wear a hat at all, not knowing how to label himself. Speaking of labels, it is really hard not judge his wines by their inimitable, ingenious labels, especially as Pieter draws every one himself and they all have an engaging and absorbing story.

New Wines

Some of the newly landed, limited edition wines – from left-to-right Epileptic Inspiration, Jaa-Bru & PhD.

Pieter’s very first, virtually self-taught effort at making wine was in his last year at Uni using a friend’s garage. Clearly he had a golden touch as he quickly sold on all he made, using his tenacity and radiating charm. His impecunious student status must have informed his decision to plough back every rand into buying more barrels and finding more extraordinary vineyards to source grapes.

In 2004, when Pieter was just beginning to bottle his own wines, one of his first customers proclaimed “I don’t do Shiraz”. So, Pieter poured her a glass of straight Shiraz, without telling her what is was. “I love it” she immediately bellowed! It was at that time that Pieter decided not to varietally label his wines, with the idea of breaking down all preconceived ideas about what you find yourself drinking.

Still to this day, Pieter has no land to his name and buys in grapes and rents vineyards, often on short-term contracts. Usually the wine’s provenance is shown as Western Cape, as the grapes that go in to the blends come from different districts. Some wines are repeated year after year, while others are one-off releases. The limitations are what excite him and there are always new parcels and opportunities arising.

In a nutshell, BLANK bottle is a series of limited edition wines, each with its own individual story, made from specially selected parcels of grapes from around the Cape. In terms of winemaking, this is about as boutique as it gets. Pieter’s scale-small winemaking is hands-off with old barrels being used so that the wine expresses a sense of place. They fit perfectly into our GOOD WINE, REAL PEOPLE, GREAT STORIES philosophy.

Pieter and Friends

Pieter, 3rd right, with his ‘party animal’ hat on, at one of our annual tasting events at The Good Wine Shop.

Having built up such a good rapport with Pieter over the last couple of years, we recently asked if he would make a wine exclusively for us. He duly barrel-fermented and blended one barrel of Macabeo with a barrel of Fernão Pires, making just 670 bottles and drew a fetching label featuring members of The Good Wine Shop team. I get a hipster makeover with some dark glasses! It has an alluring stone fruit and tropical fruit nose – peach, guava and pineapple – delicate floral tones and a richly textured palate with bright acidity and a saline mineral finish. It is a perfect match with pan-fried scallops with parsnip purée & pancetta crumbs.

The Good Wine Shop blend by BLANK bottle (yes, Pieter drew us upside down!)

The Good Wine Shop blend by BLANK bottle (yes, Pieter drew us upside down!)

What I’ll be Drinking this Christmas

1 December 2018 by Richard

The festive spirit only really comes alive in our house in mid-December, the day after my wife’s birthday… but I think I may have snaffled a record this year by consuming my first mince pies as early as September. Does that seem wrong? Listen up: my daughter’s year-round breakfast consists of a HOT CROSS BUN – now that does seem wrong to me. Surely, you should have them for high tea?! But at least you can only buy mince pies for 5 months of the year, not all year round! Like seasonal fruit and vegetables, they are so much tastier and I feel a little bit smug. I am sure I am not alone in thinking Christmas should be like the first unforced asparagus of the season. It should be a special season of indulgence, a once-a-year banquet with exceptional wine in the company of your nearest and dearest, right?
RisleusAt home, we start with some celebratory Champagne, toast our health and happiness and attempt to sing happy birthday to Jesus. This year, we will pop the Hubert Paulet Risleus 1er Cru 2002 – the flavours of ripe baked pears and apples, freshly-baked bread, buttery croissants and crushed sea-shells are super expressive and a joy to sip. All this is topped off with the London Philharmonic playing Handel’s Messiah in the background – Hosanna in the highest.
Sat down, cross-armed, we will all pull crackers, don the hats and read the jokes. Why did the turkey cross the road twice? To prove he wasn’t a chicken! Urggh, the old ones are best, aren’t they?
Speaking of the turkey, it is a misconception that I just grab a number of random bottles when locking-up the shop on Christmas Eve. No, no, my festive wines have been in the planning stage much longer than that. So, about 5 minutes before close, I will line up some options. I pick two for the turkey. What shall I have? Doah, the red Burgundy of course. Pinot Noir works wonderfully with turkey (or goose) and Domaine Arnoux-Lachaux’s Vosne-Romanee Les Chaumes Premier Cru 2008 has dark berry fruit and striking truffle and undergrowth notes. Or, should I really splurge on Roberto Voerzio’s Cerequio Barolo 2009, which is a stunner, having captivating me previously with its generous, inviting fruit and seductive personality. With the hands of the Christmas Eve wine o’clock tick-tocking down, I decide to take both.Vosne
Heading for the door, I remember the fromage wine – Stilton is a must on our cheese board and demands a sweet wine so, without hesitation, I grab Paul Meunier’s Maury with both hands. This lightly fortified, sweet yet fuzzy, port-like wine is made from old Grenache vines organically grown on a remote and windswept vineyard on rocky black schist in the Roussillon. It is a mesmerizing match.
Relieved that I have survived another Christmas in wine retail, I lob the shop keys into the foot well of my car and make a mental note to look out my Zalto Mystique decanter and Zalto Burgundy glasses so that the wines rock, along with Christmas itself.
Maury SmallBy the late afternoon of Christmas Day, replete but with my stomach now bigger than my eyes were, I get to gorge on a luxury, 12-month matured Christmas pudding. I will sneak a glass of ‘Antique’ Pedro Ximenez, aka PX, by Fernando de Castilla and (don’t tell anyone) another, later, with a mince pie. This Sherry is 20 years old and its luscious sweetness is tempered by an amazing array of complex flavours – coffee, fig, liquorice, tea and raisins. I am in heaven as all my Christmas sugar hits have landed in one stupendous smash.
Merry Christmas everyone.

Domaine Paul Meunier – a New Star is Born

29 October 2018 by Alex

P Meunier Vineyard

I first visited Paul Meunier just after his maiden vintage in 2014 after a tip-off that a bright, young, talented winemaker was breathing life back into former co-operative winery in a village called Centernach, just south of Maury in the Agly Valley in the southern Roussillon region. Such was the excitement during the visit that The Good Wine Shop decided to be the first and sole importer of these wines into the UK.

Over the preceding years Paul had been buying a few small prize plots of ancient vineyards in the hills surrounding Centernach and has been energetically nurturing the vines so that they can produce, fresh, refined, savoury, terroir-driven wines again. Powerful, sun-kissed darkly fruited and spicy, oaky wines are what you might expect from this district but Paul’s wines are light, pure and thrilling – the polar opposite.

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In part, this could be explained by Paul’s upbringing; the son of a Burgundian vintner, so wine must be in his blood. He gained immensely valuable experience making wine across the globe for 5 years, rapidly accelerated by working vintages each year in both northern and southern hemispheres. Having completed his apprenticeship Paul fell in love with the beautiful, wild vineyard landscape in this area, the towering Pyrenes as a backdrop. He also had the freedom and energy, which sometimes only a young, highly-ambitious vigneron has, to expertly express this place in his wines.

Official recordings of vineyard plantings only commenced in 1950, so many of Paul’s vineyards are at least 78 years old and some exceed 100 years. His highest site is 350 meters and whilst the soil types vary, schists, of varying colours, dominate. Very low yields of organically grown and hand harvested Carignan, Grenache, Syrah, Macabeu and Grenache Gris are naturally fermented in small, inert concrete vats, concrete eggs and ceramic amphora, all with the purpose of letting the wine & terroir express themselves.

My favourites wine is the 2015 Côtes du Roussillon Blanc made from Macabeu and Grenache Gris planted in, or before, 1950 from a 269 meter high, rugged, black schist site near the neighbouring village of St Paul de Fenouillet. It is bright with generous stone fruit flavours, a stony salinity and perfect poise and presence.

The debut 2014 vintage of the red Cotes du Roussillon Villages is carefully assembled from vineyards in the villages of St-Arnac, Lesquerde, St-Paul and Maury. Carignan, Syrah, Grenache, Lladoner Pelut (aka ‘the hairy Grenache’), Macabeu come from 10 to 100 years old vines grown at elevations from 130 to 300 meters. It is delightfully low in alcohol, especially for this part of the world and it has great elegance, refined red fruits, crunchy acidity and a note of schist. Comparisons have been made with Premier Cru Cotes de Nuits Burgundy – high praise indeed.Paul Meunier Grapes

From a single vineyard of 100% Grenache Noir planted in 1981 at 200 meters on a 0.58 hectare plot of windswept black schist is Paul’s Maury, a Vin Doux Naturel, that has a sweet, yet grippy port-like quality with a generous level of alcohol, aided by a light fortification. I believe he is doffing his hat to the vintage port houses as I established that part of it is made like port, part like a traditional Maury. It is my choice as an alternative to port this Christmas and is a more moderate, in terms of both alcohol and price.

Rave reviews from Jancis Robinson have followed but there are absolutely no signs of the dreaded DSAS – ‘difficult second album syndrome’. The opposite in fact as the current releases seem to point to stardom.

Intrigued? Click here to browse the range of wines from this great estate.

As an interesting post script, Napoleon disapproved of the Occitan language, which was widely used then, and renamed Centernach, ‘Saint Arnac’. Amusingly, Paul points out that there is no such Saint and that when spoken in French the word arnaque means a swindle! Paul understandably prefers to use the original spelling…

Bel Air-Marquis d’Aligre

6 October 2018 by Richard

As you probably know if you’re reading this, we’re always on the look out for Good Wine, Real People, and Great Stories to bring to our shelves. Some regions are always easier than others in this regard, and while no wine lover would deny the fact that some of the finest wines in the world hail from Bordeaux, many of these mainly tell a story of huge swathes of vineyard all blended and homogenised into an – often delicious – anonymised whole.

Bel Air-Marquis d’Aligre is different.

Bel Air Marquis

This is a chateau you may not have heard of before, but it could be the most important discovery you will ever make in Bordeaux.  From a bygone era, the owner, Monsieur Boyer’s energy belies his 85 years.  Remarkably, he is currently embarking on his 69th vintage at this property and his methods have remained essentially unchanged over this whole period.

He owns 50 hectares in Margaux which implies he is a large scale producer.  Nothing could be further from the truth.  One parcel remains fallow, as he pulled the vines after the 1956 frost and never got round to replanting them! In fact, he farms less than 15 hectares, highly unusual in a region obsessed with squeezing every last drop of wine out of the vineyards. Other parcels are full of ancient gnarly vines that are over 100 years old – and some may be much older.  These must be some of the oldest vines, not just in Bordeaux, but in the whole country. Unusually too, they grow on their own roots. Yields from these centenarians must be extraordinarily low, no doubt contributing to the wonderful complexity of the wines made at this property.  There is a refreshing aesthetic to these vineyards and they are ill-fitting, surrounded by the neatly manicured rows of vines more commonly found in the Bordeaux establishment.

Put politely, the winery is showing its age; lots of large cement vats, a few very old wooden barrels and some bats, who may well have made their home here for as long as the proprietor!  He treats the current state of Bordeaux with disdain and chooses not to enter the en-primeur market, instead opting to store the wine in his cellar until they are ready to drink.  Those who like their claret with bold oaky flavours should steer clear.  His wines are profound, unadulterated (no oak is used for maturation these days), remarkably pure and sappy in style, which urge you to take another sip.  It is an incredible back story and it all sounds like a massive time warp to me but one I have happily contorted myself into.

Luckily, we have a small allocation of the 2000, a vintage which produced ripe flavours and lush, velvety wines.  Whilst the Bel Air Marquis d’Aligre reflects the warm vintage conditions with good concentration and polish it also retains a beautiful purity, freshness and a gentle grip.  All these gradually open up into something with a timeless class that shares more in common with an elegant Burgundy than most Bordeaux.

New Arrivals for Summer

27 July 2018 by Alex

Lots of great new bottles have hit the shelves in the last few weeks, so we thought we’d share a selection of our favourites to inspire you during this warm weather!

Huber, Riesling Engelsberg, Traisental, Austria, 2017

Huber Riesling

 

 

 

Our favourite new dry Riesling comes from Traisental in Austria. Showing intense but cool peach and lemon fruit on the nose, the palate has the typical Austrian combination of dense texture and lively acidity. Vinified in stainless steel with 4 hours skin contact and 4 months on the lees.

Ventisei Bianco, Tuscany, Italy, 2017

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Part of a trio of wines from the Ventisei (Italian for twenty-six) brand that have just hit the shelves. The wines are made by Eline Saverys, the daughter of the winemaker at renowned Tuscan estate Avignonesi, who started her own wine bar in Antwerp at the age of 26 – hence the name! Experimenting with her own blends of organic grapes with the aim of creating something vibrant and super-drinkable led Eline to create the Ventisei brand, and we think she has been very successful! The Ventisei bianco is a blend 40.5% Trebbiano, 40.5% Malvasisa Bianca, and 19% Sangiovese, brimming with peachy fruit and white flowers and just generally incredibly summery and moreish!

Bodega Goiania, Txakoli Uno, Spain, 2015

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If you’ve ever been to San Sebastian, you may be familiar with Txakoli: incredibly refreshing in the sun, high in acidity, sometimes slightly fizzy, and free-flowing in every Pintxos bar in town. This Txakoli retains this freshness and thirst-quenching quality but the benefit of 5 months ageing on lees has transformed it into an entirely different animal. Mineral, citrussy, and tense with a rounded texture, this has more than a little in common with a good premier cru Chablis but for a much more friendly price tag!

Huber, Zweigelt Rosé, Traisental, Austria, 2017

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Although perhaps from a leftfield source, this dry rosé has been one of our favourites this summer. Jam-packed with strawberry, raspberry, and cranberry fruit, some of the Zweigelt vines used for this cuvée are 50 years old giving an extra depth of flavour. Impressive for its creamy texture sitting alongside a very modest 11.5% alcohol, we highly recommend taking a detour from Provence next time you’re thinking pink!

Ventisei Vino Nobile di Montepulciano, Tuscany, Italy, 2015

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Eline Saverys’s red wine from the prestigious Vino Nobile di Montepulciano DOCG is a structured and serious wine from 90% Sangiovese and 10% Merlot. Each plot of Sangiovese grapes is aged separately in various sizes of oak barrels before being assembled into the final blend. Fragrant, with brooding dark fruits, and sweet cinnamon spice.

La Clarine Farm Jambalaia Rouge, Sierra Foothills, California, 2015

Jambalia

 

 

 

Delicious unfiltered red made from a field blend of Mourvedre, Marsanne, Grenache and Syrah. It’s all about the juice, pale red with lovely freshness, herbs and minerals. A full-flavoured red that’s lighter in body than one would expect. Serving this chilled in the sunshine really enhances the juiciness of the fruit and the general vibrancy of this wine.

First Drop, ‘2%’ Shiraz, Barossa Valley, Australia, 2015

FD 2p

 

 

 

The Shiraz grapes for this wine come from the Seppeltsfield, Greenock and Ebenezer areas of the Barossa. Aged in a mixture of new and old French hogsheads and American barriques for 20-24 months, giving a dark-fruited, earthy style with notes of tobacco and cocoa. So far so delicious, yet relatively conventional, so First Drop decided to add 2% of the fragrant white Moscatel for ‘a splash of funk!’.

BYO Podcast Episodes

12 March 2018 by Alex

Our podcast ‘Bring Your Own’ is going from strength to strength with a great new episode every month. In order to keep you up to date with everything that’s happening in the world of BYO we have created this treasure trove of episodes, below you will find links to all available episodes on YouTube starting with the most recent. Check back here monthly for your latest update!

Click the links to subscribe on:

iTunes
Stitcher
YouTube

New Arrivals!

6 March 2018 by Alex

The early part of the year is always a time for fresh starts and new approaches, and we at The Good Wine Shop are no exception. Don’t worry though, we won’t be throwing the baby out with the bath water and getting rid of all your old favourites, we will mostly just be adding great new wines that deserve everyone’s attention! With that in mind we thought now would be a good time to bring your attention to a selection of new bottles that have just hit the shelves. Click the wine name to view.

Petit Sios, Costers del Segre, Spain, 2016

petit sios landscape

 

 

 

This white from the Costers del Segre region in Catalunya is based on 60% Viognier with Chardonnay and Muscat. Although made from full bodied and aromatic grapes, this is surprisingly crisp and shows good minerality. The fruit here is mostly white peach and apricot with some tropical nuances.

Cailloux du Paradis Quartz, Loire Valley, France, 2015

Quartz Landscape

 

 

 

An intensely mineral Sauvignon Blanc, with stoney, flinty flavours that make it worthy of its name. Although the polar opposite style to a stereotypical ‘New World’ Sauvignon, there is still plenty of zesty lemon and grapefruit flavour here. In many ways better than a lot of Sancerres or Pouilly-Fumes at this price.

Pax ‘Buddha’s Dharma’ Chenin Blanc, Mendocino County, USA, 2015

Pax BUddha Landscape

 

 

 

Made from vines over 70 years of age, this is a rich, dense, creamy Chenin Blanc with a mouth-coating texture. Notes of ripe apricot, white flowers and honey abound on the nose. Great with any creamy fish or chicken dish.

Chanin Wine Co, Bien Nacido Vineyard Chardonnay, Santa Maria Valley, California, USA, 2015

Chanin_Bien_NacidoChard Landscape

 

 

 

The Chanin Wine Co. crafts wines from various vineyards in Santa Barbara county that are intended to express the best characteristics of their individual site. The wines emphasise balance and complexity without excessive alcohol. The Bien Nacido Chardonnay is wonderfully nutty, with ripe lemon fruit and salty mineral touches. Aged in oak for 15 months but only 10% of this is new. Lots of Californian Chardonnays claim to be restrained and elegant, but this truly embodies these qualities in a seemingly effortless manner.

Jean Vesselle, Pur B3 Grand Cru, Brut Nature, Bouzy, Champagne, France, 2012

Jean Vesselle B3 Landscape

 

 

 

An unusual 100% Chardonnay wine from the Grand Cru village of Bouzy, which is best known for its Pinot Noir. This wine is a chance to see the quality of a pure Chardonnay Champagne grown on these prestigious soils. Rich and textured yet mineral.

Alfredo Maestro, Vina Almate, Tinto, Castilla Y Leon, Spain, 2016

almate Landscape

 

 

 

Alfredo Maestro is based in Ribera del Duero, and is passionate about finding and rehabilitating parcels of vines in the Castilla y Leon region too, one of which forms the basis for this great value red. Alfredo works organically, and with no additions in the winery except a minimum of sulphur at bottling. This is 100% Tempranillo with 80% whole clusters included, fermented with indigenous yeasts. The vineyards are located between 700 and 1000 metres above sea level, helping to give a lovely aromatic perfume to the wine alongside impressive concentration of flavour. A lot of wine for the money!

Stolpman Vineyards, La Cuadrilla, Ballard Canyon, USA, 2015

La Cuadrilla Landscape

 

 

 

Stolpman Vineyards’ La Cuadrilla stems from a novel and admirable concept: the vineyard workers tend a speicifc section of vines to form the basis of the cuvee. The result is then blended with some more fruit from the estate to ensure that production represents at least 10% of annual production. Stolpman then give all the profits from the wine to the vineyard workers directly. Not just a nice story, this wine is a delicious, spicy blend of 68% Syrah, 20% Grenache, 6% Petite Sirah, and 6% Sangiovese. Dense and structured, but ripe and drinkable.

Cailloux du Paradis Racines Rouge, Loire Valley, France, 2014

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Winemaker Claude Courtois cultivates his small property in an obscure corner of the Loire valley. The red version of Racines is made from an undisclosed number of red varieties (Courtois is keen to emphasise the importance of viewing his wines as wholes rather than talking about the grape varieties contained within). Typically the majority of the wine is made from Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, and Cot (the local name for Malbec). Very low intervention winemaking, with no added sulphur and everything done by hand. Perfumed and full of violet aromas on the nose, the palate has lots of crisp, crunchy ripe fruit along with a firm but subtle tannic structure.

Sato “Pisa Terrace” Pinot Noir, Central Otago, New Zealand, 2015

Sato Pinot

 

 

 

Brilliant ‘natural’ Pinot Noir from Central Otago in New Zealand, nothing is added to this wine than a tiny amount of sulphur when the wine is bottled. Yoshiaki and Kyoko Sato make only a tiny volume of wine in each vintage. Perfumed, pure fruit and delicious herbal nuances.

Tabarrini “Campo alla Cerqua” Sagrantino di Montefalco, Umbria, Italy, 2008

Tabarrini Campo Cerqua Landscape

 

 

 

The Campo alla Cerqua vineyard has loose, stony soils which – in contrast to the heavier clay of the Grimaldesco vineyard – give a wine of more elegance, minerality, and finesse. To enchance these characteristics the wine ages only in large oak barrels, mellowing the wine without imparting oaky flavours.

A Once in a Lifetime Tasting: Miani

23 February 2018 by Alex

Miani Corks

TDrops of Godhe term “icon” is often abused in the wine world, a designation too hastily assigned to any estate which receives the slightest acclaim. But when it comes to the wines of Miani, the label doesn’t quite do justice to the profound wines from the estate. Perhaps Miani’s inclusion in the wine-focused graphic novel series “Drops of God” delivers a more fitting tribute to these unique wines.

Enzo Cellar

Enzo Pontoni at work

Reclusive winemaker Enzo Pontoni in the Friuli Venezia Giulia region is truly one of the greatest in Italy. Unfortunately, his fiercely uncompromising approach to quality in the vineyards and cellars ensures that there is never enough wine to go around, but we have secured excellent allocations of a wide range of his wines this year. In order to give as many people as possible a chance to experience these beautiful creations we decided to host an unprecedented tasting in the Chiswick store showcasing a wide range of Enzo’s wines. Bruno Besa, an expert on Enzo’s wines who has been working with him for almost 20 years joined us for this tasting. Despite having visited Enzo in his winery almost every year for the last 20 years, Bruno remarked that he had never tasted so many Miani wines from bottle at once. We were lucky to have Bruno on hand to share an unparalleled level of insight into what makes these wines so special.

The Miani wines are becoming more sought after every year, and it is very unlikely that the opportunity to put on this tasting will ever arise again. We have a precious few Miani wines still in stock at the time of this article, click here to browse them online, although they may not be there for long!

Below are details of what we tasted on the night:

Sauvignon Zitelle Alto 2015 & Sauvignon Zitelle Cava – these two expressions of Sauvignon Blanc are from a single vineyard (‘Le Zitelle’ means spinsters in English) that Enzo acquired in 2006 and completely replanted – his grandfather had made some of the original plantings here many years ago so this site Miani Chardonnay Webhas a special place in Enzo’s heart. The vines are just becoming old enough to produce wines that live up to Enzo’s high standards and these are the first releases of Sauvignon Blanc from here. The Cava Sauvignon is from a section of very poor soils that give an extra-concentrated wine show very dense, exotic flavours and deep minerality. The Alto is more aromatic and expressive at the moment with great purity.

Ribolla Gialla Pettarin 2016 & Friulano Filip 2016 – these individual vineyard expressions of the two greatest Friulian white grapes are named after the families that farmed them in years past. These two wines are the most sought after whites in the Miani stable. The Ribolla is delicate, fresh, and floral but with impressive density and texture. The Friulano is an incredibly intense wine, with masses of structure for a white wine: everything is here from acidity and richness of texture to extremely intense exotic fruit and minerality.

Chardonnay Palis 2015 – a new wine from the 2015 vintage onwards, this rich but mineral single vineyard Chardonnay is a future classic. Compared to many other Chardonnays this has a wonderfully ethereal, delicate character – there’s an almost playful feel to the wine. At the same time there is a hint of seriousness and the promise of future development.

Miani Rosso 2013 – a blend of Merlot and Refosco from a spectacular vintage, the Refosco comes from younger vines in a new, very exciting Refosco vineyard which will be bottled separately in future vintages when the vines are mature. This shows a lot of the richness, brightness, and concentration of the two single vineyard Merlots but with some beguiling herbal and earthy character coming from the Refosco. This is a slightly lighter weight red for Miani, but no less enticing because of it.miani-rosso-web

Merlot “Filip” 2013 & Merlot “Buri” 2013 – this was a fascinating chance to compare these two monumental Merlots from two different vineyards in the same, excellent vintage. Buri is from the village of Buttrio and is structured and complex, while Filip originates in Rosazzo and is rounder and more generous in youth. The Filip showed as the lighter of the two wines but this is more of a testament to the sheer monolithic power and intensity of the Buri. Both wines show incredible brightness of fruit – a quality that could almost be described as ‘aromatic’. There is a truly amazing level of ripeness to all aspects of these wines which never strays into over-ripe, stewed, or ‘Porty’ territory. No wonder Antonio Galloni described the Buri as ‘one of the most profound expressions of Merlot on the planet’.

BYO Podcast – Episode Four: Pinot Noir

12 December 2017 by Alex

 

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Episode four of our monthly podcast focuses on the profound and capricious Pinot Noir grape. For the uninitiated, ‘Bring Your Own’ is a podcast and video web series (in conjunction with Bottled Films) about wine and the people who make it, made by the people who drink it. Each episode has a theme centred around a wine region or style, and takes the form of a free-flowing, informal, and educational conversation.

Today’s session takes a look at Pinot Noir and some of its most famous expressions in Champagne and Burgundy. We’ve gathered a group of wine lovers to share bottles from their own cellars and to chat about what makes the grape so interesting, and the wines so memorable. We were lucky to be hosted by the great team at Kitchen Table and Bubbledogs in Central London for the filming of this episode. Tucked in the back of Bubbledogs on Charlotte Street, Kitchen Table is one of the most exciting restaurants in London, led by owner/Chef James Knappett. You can find them online at www.kitchentablelondon.co.uk

Follow us on social media, @BYOPodcast and share or rate this episode.

Please subscribe to the podcast to make sure you catch all future episodes: here

Enjoy, follow and subscribe on social media @BYOPodcast.

You can now support the project through our new Patreon page, https://www.patreon.com/bringyourown

The Wines:

Champagne Jacquesson Dizy “Terres Rouge” Rose Extra Brut 2009
Ulysse Collin “Les Maillons” Blanc de Noirs 2012
Domaine Bizot Vosne-Romanee 2014
Domaine Claude Dugat Gevrey Chambertin 2009

Find our host and guests online:

Derek Morrison @DerekDecanted
The Good Wine Shop – www.thegoodwineshop.co.uk

Dan Roznov @ChampagneSpy www.vivino.com/users/champagnespywww.champagnefriends.ch Peter Crawford @Alavolee Alavolee – www.alavolee.com
Christina Rasmussen @ChristinaRasmussen_ www.christinarasmussen.co

BYO Podcast – Episode Three: South Africa

24 November 2017 by Alex

BYO Ep3 Img1

Episode three of our monthly podcast focuses on the ‘New Wave’ wines of South Africa. For the uninitiated, ‘Bring Your Own’ is a podcast and video web series (in conjunction with Bottled Films) about wine and the people who make it, made by the people who drink it. Each episode has a theme centred around a wine region or style, and takes the form of a free-flowing, informal, and educational conversation.

This episode we were really lucky to be hosted at Terroirs Wine Bar in Central London for the filming of this episode. Around the corner from Trafalgar Square, Terroirs is a must visit in London for any winelover. You can find them online at www.terroirswinebar.com.

Joining our own inimitable Derek Morrison this episode are Hannes Storm of Storm Wines (@stormwinessa https://www.stormwines.co.za/), writer/wine judge Treve Ring (@treve_ring http://treve.ca/), and Craig Wessels of Restless River Wines (@restlessriverRR www.restlessriver.com).

The wines tasted in this episode are:

Restless River “Ava Marie” Chardonnay 2015
Storm Wines “Moya’s” Pinot Noir 2014
Alheit “Radio Lazarus” Chenin Blanc 2012
Craven Wines Pinot Gris 2015
Keermont Vineyards Syrah 2014
Klein Constantia Vin de Constance 2013
(Click the links to find similar wines in stock with us)

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