Chateau Mercian, Koshu Gris de Gris 2018

£20.00

  • Type:

    White

  • Grape:

    Koshu

  • Country:

    Japan

  • Grape Blend:

    Koshu 100%

  • Region:

    Honshu

  • Vegan:

    Yes

  • Area:

    Fuefuki

  • Organic:

    No

  • ABV:

    11.5%

  • Winemaker:

    Mitsuhiro Anzo

  • Bottle Size:

    750ml

In Stock

Description

Faint reddish orange hue. Sweet and gentle aromas of apricot, apple compote, Darjeeling, old Rose with subtle vanilla notes are derived from 8 months in oak barrels. The complex palate from the skins and seeds of the Koshu grape come from gentle skin contact, this creates a three-dimensional feeling in the mouth.

  • Production Notes
  • Producer
  • Critics Reviews

Koshu grapes are grown in the Fuefuki district, one of the 13 cities located in Yamanashi Prefecture. Harvest takes place from late September to early October. This wine spends 3 weeks on skins to achieve the vibrant apricot-skin hue. Fermentation in a stainless steel tank at 24 to 26 degrees for about 28 days, in an oak barrel at 20 to 22 degrees for about 14 days. The wine spends 8 months in oak barrels.

 The existing grape variety most successfully grown in Japan became known as Koshu, which was the then name for the prefecture in which it grew. This prefecture then took the name of a Japanese prince and became Yamanashi, which remains the principal region producing Koshu. Responsible today for 40% of all Japanese grown wine grapes, it is believed to be the naturalised hybrid of a Georgian grape variety. Ampelographers continue to isolate the DNA of Koshu, but we do not actually know, outright, its source. What we do know is that it is a lurid pink on the vine, generally grown in the local tana method (overhead bamboo trellis). Château Mercian grows Chardonnay, Merlot, Syrah, Cabernet Franc and Petit Verdot, whilst experimenting with Albarino, Mencia and others, and has always shared its long experience of producing wine in Japan with every other producer in the region. Château Mercian is the oldest established winery in Japan, starting out in 1870 having sent two young men to France to understand wine making in the European tradition. Indeed the descendants of these two men are still growing Koshu for Mercian today. Koshu, like many things Japanese, is all about subtlety of flavour, texture and the wine being part of a greater organoleptic experience than the wine itself, so imagine drinking this with a slurpy bowl of hot yum from a chilly noodle shop in the hills. It's part of the whole, not the whole, therefore the fruit is not overt, it's more about texture, acidity and finish rather than outright fruit flavour.

Critics reviews will be uploaded shortly

Customer Reviews

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R
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Curiously interesting