Chateau Bel-Air Marquis de Aligre 2010

£78.00

  • Type:

    Red

  • Grape:

    Bordeaux Blend

  • Country:

    France

  • Grape Blend:

    Merlot 35%,Cabernet Sauvignon 30%,Cabernet Franc 20%,Petit Verdot 10%,Malbec�5%

  • Region:

    Bordeaux

  • Vegan:

    No

  • Area:

    Margaux

  • Organic:

    Yes

  • ABV:

    TBA

  • Winemaker:

    JP Boyer

  • Bottle Size:

    750ml

Tasting Notes

Dark crimson. Intense and stony on the nose. Lots of cassis and youthful with a dry, stony end. Very firm and juicy. Needs lots of time. Again, clean and fresh. Racy. More lifted than the norm". Jancis Robinson 17 points.

  • Production Notes
  • Producer
  • Critics Reviews

The vines here are suitably old, some over 100yo, from the west of the appellation above Virefougasse, where there is a fine, sandy texture to the soils. Jean-Pierre Boyer has never followed trends, dispensing with all oak for ageing back in the 1960s and instead carrying out a long patient three year elevage in cement cuves, and then selling the wine when it�s at least ten years old. All his wines are renowned for their long ageing capacity.

From Neal Martin, Vinous - �Although it is not the most famous or familiar chateau I will ever write about, Bel-Air Marquis d�Aligre constitutes one of the most important�Born May 1933, Jean-Pierre Boyer�s energy belies the fact that he is about to turn eighty-five � nothing unusual there. Many winemakers work until they are physically incapable. What�is�remarkable is that Jean-Pierre is embarking upon his 68th vintage at the same property. That is not a typo.�Sixty-eight vintages. Think about that for a moment�.. This man remembers helping his father Pierre make the 1947 vintage. His calloused hands tended the vines and bottled the 1947, 1949, 1959, 1961, 1982, 2009 and one hopes, 2018, and everything between. Even more astonishing is that his�modus operandi, his tenets and practices, remained unaltered from his first day to this. It is forgotten Bordeaux made corporeal and if you don�t believe me, then I guarantee you will by the time you finish reading this article.�Before I continue, let me forewarn that Jean-Pierre is not a man for details. He doesn�t do them. He tells me that he�s too old for those kinds of things and doubts their importance. I am able to glean that he owns around a considerable 50-hectares of vines scattered over all five communes within Margaux, some under long-standing�fermage�agreements with Chateau Ferri�re, Lucien Lurton being an old friend. It implies Bel-Air Marquis d�Aligre produces a large volume; however, the parcel directly outside the winery lies fallow with wild grass and poppies. �I pulled up the vines in 1956 after they were killed by the frost and I just never got round to replanting,� he explains. �I could do it, I suppose.� Jean-Pierre seems content to look upon the fallow land, exercising his right to not plant any vines, to the chagrin of his neighbors. The parcel beyond is pot-marked by numerous gaping holes between vines, aesthetically akin to some ancient old Grenache vineyards I saw in Rioja, incongruous in a region that prides itself on regimented high-density rows manicured to within an inch of their lives. He divulges that at some point, he exchanged several parcels with Chateau Margaux; indeed, one of his plots is adjacent to Pavillon Blanc de Margaux. This exchange transpired before the Mentzelopoulos family bought the First Growth, when Pierre Ginestet was the proprietor. Digging around texts I found that only 13-hectares are farmed with some rented out to neighbours, which means annual production is roughly 2,500 cases. The vines. Wow. I have visited most of the major vineyards in Bordeaux and never encountered any like these. �I have vines that are over 100-years old, maybe dating back to the 1870s on their own roots,� Boyer tells me, vanquishing the idea that the only Gallic vines on their original roots lie chez Bollinger. Winemakers often boast about the age of their vines, exaggerating and adding a few years. Inspecting these veterans close-up, they must constitute not just some of the oldest in Bordeaux, but in France��

Critics reviews will be uploaded shortly

Customer Reviews

No reviews yet
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)
0%
(0)